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Nickname: PapiMoreno
Country: Italy
City: Torino
Status: Active
Tribe: Pop
Description

Papi Moreno's world

I learned to play the didjeridu on my own years ago here in Turin, while having a strong feeling of loneliness and isolation as it was impossible to get clues or people helping me in how to go ahead. It got me after watching an Aboriginal Group performance where the didjeridu accompanied traditional songs and dances. Caught by the sound of this instrument I went closer to the stage to watch which technique the musician was actually using. I could not guess what was happening to me: the seed of my new life. My work as copywriter and my agency became increasingly a memory fading away since then. All occurred thanks to a inner guide which took me into this wonderful world. To me playing the didjeridu does not only mean to produce sounds within...

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I learned to play the didjeridu on my own years ago here in Turin, while having a strong feeling of loneliness and isolation as it was impossible to get clues or people helping me in how to go ahead. It got me after watching an Aboriginal Group performance where the didjeridu accompanied traditional songs and dances. Caught by the sound of this instrument I went closer to the stage to watch which technique the musician was actually using. I could not guess what was happening to me: the seed of my new life. My work as copywriter and my agency became increasingly a memory fading away since then. All occurred thanks to a inner guide which took me into this wonderful world. To me playing the didjeridu does not only mean to produce sounds within rhythmical patterns, but also to get in touch with my deepest sides, these arising only in particular moments. I reach my inner spaces with the didje and I catch my creativity there. My advice is then to technically learn how to play the instrument and then leave it for your own expression when you feel loose with it. First of all my thanks go to the Aboriginal People from which this instrument comes and who find it hard to get back to their dignity. The fact that many white people play the didjeridu today is not happily welcome by all the Aboriginal People. But it is tremendously crucial to split who masters this research and plays his own music without stealing anything from its original and sacred culture. Similar instruments are played in some parts of the world with quite different techniques and inspiration. Play it if you like it but do it in you personal way, spontaneously and musically.

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